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Archive for the ‘Children’s Poetry’ Category


The sound–like sleet upon a roof

draws me outside to see

a great flock of European Starlings

filling the surrounding fall trees.

surrounding me.

 

 

 

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Wings that can’t be seen

iridescent blues and greens

tiny hummingbird

 

 

Is it Anishinabe haiku

because an Anishinabe wrote it,

or is it Anishinabe haiku

because of the subject?

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March is a month of many transitions so it has a few Anishinabe names to describe these. There is:

Ăn·dĕ´gō·gē´zĭs, or Crow Moon. Not that Crows migrate, but they fly around the area more. Perhaps because the warmer weather during March days melts the snow and the crows search to eat the preserved bodies of various animals which the melting snow reveals. (Hence my Haiku yesterday 🙂 )

crow moon
Also

Canadian Goose Moon

Nĭ·kĭ´gē´zĭs, or Canadian Goose Moon. This is the time of the year when the Canadian Geese start migrating back north if the weather is favorable.

There is also  Ō´nă·bă·nĭ·gē´zĭs or Hard Crusted Snow Moon. With warmer weather during the days, the snow melts and then freezes again at night, causing its surface to develop a hard crust. Sometimes, during the day, it is just warm enough for there to be sleet that freezes when it hits the frozen snow on the earth.

and,

Bĕ·bū·kwĕ´daa·gĭ·mĕ-gē´zĭs, the Snowshoe Breaking Moon; Because of the hard crust, it is easier to break your snowshoes when walking on this type of snow.

or,

Zēn·sĭ·baa·kwăd´ōkē´gē´zĭs, or, Maple Sugar Making Moon. Warm days and chilly nights are the best kind of weather for Maple Sugaring as the sap flows best in these circumstances.

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Galumping hoary woodchuck

glances/pauses long enough,

for the romping golden puppy to catch up.

The deck resonates.

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I was in one of those moods again this morning where words from a different language go through my head just because I like the way they sound.

Gĭ·gă·wă·bă·mĭn´
Gĭ·gă·wă·bă·mĭn´
Gĭ´gă·wă·bă·
Gĭ´gă·wă·bă
Gĭ·gă·wă·bă·mĭ·nē·nĭm´!

_________________________
(I will) See you (singular)
(I will) See you (singular)
See you
See you
(I will) See you all! (all/plural)

Oops! Correction! I originally Titled this “See you later”, but in order for that to be accurate,  one has to add “nă·gŭj” which means: later.

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